Lest We Forget

God is not all peaches and cream (mercy and forgiveness) , but also fire and brimstone (capital punishment and Hell), as this article from Catholic World Report discussing Wind in the Willows and The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, notes.

An excerpt.

“There is a striking passage in The Problem of Pain where C.S. Lewis writes about awe and the Numinous. He draws on Malory, Shakespeare, and Wordsworth to exemplify his points but also approvingly quotes a rather unexpected source: Kenneth Grahame’s The Wind in the Willows.

“A modern example may be found (if we are not too proud to seek it there) in The Wind in the Willows where Rat and Mole approach Pan on the island.

“‘Rat,’ he found breath to whisper, shaking, ‘Are you afraid?’

‘Afraid?’ murmured the Rat, his eyes shining with unutterable love. ‘Afraid? Of Him? O, never, never! And yet – and yet – O, Mole, I am afraid.’”

“Lewis may well have had this passage in mind ten years later when he wrote The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. On first hearing about Aslan, Lucy asks Mr Beaver whether he is safe. “’Course he isn’t safe,” the beaver replied. “But he’s good. He’s the King, I tell you.” This short interchange prepares us for the first meeting between the children and Aslan himself many pages further on in the book. It is a meeting that is strongly reminiscent of Rat and Mole’s encounter with Pan for the children were also afraid and yet they were not, and their eyes shone with unutterable love:

“But as for Aslan himself, the Beavers and the children didn’t know what to do or say when they saw him. People who have not been in Narnia sometimes think that a thing cannot be good and terrible at the same time. If the children had ever thought so, they were cured of it now. For when they tried to look at Aslan’s face they just caught a glimpse of the golden mane and the great, royal, solemn, overwhelming eyes; and then they found they couldn’t look at him and went all trembly.”

Retrieved October 22, 2019 from https://www.catholicworldreport.com/2019/10/21/tolkien-lewis-and-the-wind-in-the-willows/

Saints of the Day

Here are the saints for October 22, 2019.

The Saints are the holy bones of the Church and their lives the true Magisterium.

The Catholic Church has many saints and reading about their lives has been a spiritual journey Catholics have been on since the publication of the Golden Legend, http://sourcebooks.web.fordham.edu/basis/goldenlegend/

From Butler’s Calendar of the Saints (which follows the old dating) listing all of the saints of today. https://web.archive.org/web/20061023135312/http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/day1022.htm

From Butler’s Lives of the Saints, (old dating) by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. edition, [1894], ST. MELLO, Bishop.—ST. HILARION, Abbot. “ST. MELLO is said to have been a native of Great Britain; his mal for the Faith engaged him in the sacred ministry, and God having blessed his labors with wonderful success, he was consecrated first bishop of Rouen in Normandy, which see he is said to have held forty years.

“He died in peace, about the beginning of the fourth century.

“ST. HILARION was born of heathen parents, near Gaza, and was converted while studying grammar in Alexandria. Shortly after, he visited St. Antony, and, still only in his fifteenth year, he became a solitary in the Arabian desert. A multitude of monks, attracted by his sanctity, peopled the desert where he lived. In consequence of this, he fled from one country to another, seeking to escape the praise of men; but everywhere his miracles of mercy betrayed his presence. Even his last retreat at Cyprus was broken by a paralytic, who was cured by St. Hilarion, and then spread the fame of the Saint. He died with the words, “Go forth, my soul; why dost thou doubt? Nigh seventy years hast thou served God, and dost thou fear death?” https://www.sacred-texts.com/chr/lots/lots328.htm

From Franciscan Media, (new dating) St. John Paul II, (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005), “Open wide the doors to Christ,” urged John Paul II during the homily at the Mass where he was installed as pope in 1978.

“Born in Wadowice, Poland, Karol Jozef Wojtyla had lost his mother, father, and older brother before his 21st birthday. Karol’s promising academic career at Krakow’s Jagiellonian University was cut short by the outbreak of World War II. While working in a quarry and a chemical factory, he enrolled in an “underground” seminary in Kraków. Ordained in 1946, he was immediately sent to Rome where he earned a doctorate in theology.

“Back in Poland, a short assignment as assistant pastor in a rural parish preceded his very fruitful chaplaincy for university students. Soon Fr. Wojtyla earned a doctorate in philosophy and began teaching that subject at Poland’s University of Lublin.

“Communist officials allowed Wojtyla to be appointed auxiliary bishop of Kraków in 1958, considering him a relatively harmless intellectual. They could not have been more wrong!

“Bishop Wojtyla attended all four sessions of Vatican II and contributed especially to its Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World. Appointed as archbishop of Kraków in 1964, he was named a cardinal three years later.

“Elected pope in October 1978, he took the name of his short-lived, immediate predecessor. Pope John Paul II was the first non-Italian pope in 455 years. In time, he made pastoral visits to 124 countries, including several with small Christian populations.

“John Paul II promoted ecumenical and interfaith initiatives, especially the 1986 Day of Prayer for World Peace in Assisi. He visited Rome’s main synagogue and the Western Wall in Jerusalem; he also established diplomatic relations between the Holy See and Israel. He improved Catholic-Muslim relations, and in 2001 visited a mosque in Damascus, Syria.

“The Great Jubilee of the Year 2000, a key event in John Paul’s ministry, was marked by special celebrations in Rome and elsewhere for Catholics and other Christians. Relations with the Orthodox Churches improved considerably during his papacy.

“Christ is the center of the universe and of human history” was the opening line of John Paul II’s 1979 encyclical, Redeemer of the Human Race. In 1995, he described himself to the United Nations General Assembly as “a witness to hope.”

“His 1979 visit to Poland encouraged the growth of the Solidarity movement there and the collapse of communism in central and eastern Europe 10 years later. John Paul II began World Youth Day and traveled to several countries for those celebrations. He very much wanted to visit China and the Soviet Union, but the governments in those countries prevented that.

“One of the most well-remembered photos of John Paul II’s pontificate was his one-on-one conversation in 1983, with Mehmet Ali Agca, who had attempted to assassinate him two years earlier.

“In his 27 years of papal ministry, John Paul II wrote 14 encyclicals and five books, canonized 482 saints and beatified 1,338 people. In the last years of his life, he suffered from Parkinson’s disease and was forced to cut back on some of his activities.

“Pope Benedict XVI beatified John Paul II in 2011, and Pope Francis canonized him in 2014.” https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-john-paul-ii/

From Tradition in Action, (old dating) St. Abercius, “In the year 161, when Marcus Aurelius became Emperor, Abercius was Bishop of Hierapolis (in today’s Turkey), a city dedicated to Apollo and evangelized by St. Paul. He was already known for his virtues when an episode occurred that made him famous.

“The new Emperor had intensified the cult to the idols and since the city of Hierapolis was consecrated to one of them, the number of processions to the pagan gods there increased. Abercius suffered greatly from this and frequently prayed to God asking for the destruction of the temple idols. One night as he slept, he saw an Angel who handed him a rod and told him: “Wake up! The time has come! Take this rod and strike down the false gods that deceive the people.”

“He arose and made haste to the temple, and destroyed Apollo, Hercules, Diana and Venus, breaking them into pieces. Roused by the enormous noise, the priests and guards entered, surprised to find the Bishop there.

“Abercius told them: “Go and tell the magistrates and the people of Hierapolis that their gods, overstuffed with flesh and wine, became drunk and fell, one on top of another, and are now reduced to pieces. Take away this rubble if you have any use for it.”

“With these words he left the temple. No one dared to touch him. He continued on his way to give his customary morning class to his disciples.

“Shortly afterward, however, the furious pagans sought him out to kill him. Three men of the city who were known to be possessed, shouting and biting themselves, placed themselves between the Bishop and the crowd. The mob fell silent. Albercius raised his hands over the possessed men and prayed, saying these words: “Almighty God, Father of Jesus Christ, whose mercy infinitely surpasses the malice of men, I beg Thee, free these unfortunate men from the chains of Satan, so that the people may recognize Thee as their true God.”

“He touched the possessed men with his rod, and they fell motionless at his feet. He helped them to their feet and they stood before the crowd, safe and sound. Then he told them to return to their houses. Witnessing this spectacle, the multitude called out in unison: “Baptism, baptism! The God of Abercius is the true God!”

“After this episode, the fame of St. Abercius spread throughout Asia. People came from far and wide to ask for his help. The Emperor himself asked St. Abercius to heal his daughter Lucilla, who was possessed.

“Forewarned supernaturally of his death, he prepared his tomb to be built in marble and wrote a long epitaph, which became known as the Inscriptions of Abercius. He died in 167 with 72 years of age.” https://traditioninaction.org/SOD/j228sd_Albercius10_22.html

 

Saints of the Day

Here are the saints for October 21, 2019.

The Saints are the holy bones of the Church and their lives the true Magisterium.

The Catholic Church has many saints and reading about their lives has been a spiritual journey Catholics have been on since the publication of the Golden Legend, http://sourcebooks.web.fordham.edu/basis/goldenlegend/

From Butler’s Calendar of the Saints (which follows the old dating) listing all of the saints of today. https://web.archive.org/web/20061023134811/http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/day1021.htm

Here is what the 1962 Roman Missal (old dating) says about St. Hilarion, Abbot, “St. Hilarion, a native of Palestine, was instructed by the first lawgiver of the anchorites, St. Anthony the Great, and became one of the founders of the eremitical life in the Holy Land, Syria and Egypt. He died A. D. 372.” (p. 1543). The Daily Missal and Liturgical Manual. (2004). To purchase this Missal for your library go to the publisher, Baronius Press: London: https://www.baroniuspress.com/book.php?wid=56&bid=4#tab=tab-1

From Butler’s Lives of the Saints, (old dating) by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. edition, [1894], ST. URSULA, Virgin and Martyr. “A NUMBER of Christian families had entrusted the education of their children to the care of the pious Ursula, and some persons of the world had in like manner placed themselves under her direction. England being then harassed by the Saxons, Ursula deemed that she ought, after the example of many of her compatriots, to seek an asylum in Gaul. She met with an abiding-place on the borders of the Rhine, not far from Cologne, where she hoped to find undisturbed repose; but a horde of Huns having invaded the country, she was exposed, together with all those who were under her guardianship, to the most shameful outrages. Without wavering, they preferred one and all to meet death rather than incur shame. Ursula herself gave the example, and was, together with her companions, cruelly massacred in the year 453. The name of St. Ursula has from remote ages been held in great honor throughout the Church; she has always been regarded as the patroness of young persons and the model of teachers.” https://www.sacred-texts.com/chr/lots/lots327.htm

From Franciscan Media, (new dating) St. Hilarion, (c. 291 – 371), “Despite his best efforts to live in prayer and solitude, today’s saint found it difficult to achieve his deepest desire. People were naturally drawn to Hilarion as a source of spiritual wisdom and peace. He had reached such fame by the time of his death that his body had to be secretly removed so that a shrine would not be built in his honor. Instead, he was buried in his home village.

“Saint Hilarion the Great, as he is sometimes called, was born in Palestine. After his conversion to Christianity, he spent some time with Saint Anthony of Egypt, another holy man drawn to solitude. Hilarion lived a life of hardship and simplicity in the desert, where he also experienced spiritual dryness that included temptations to despair. At the same time, miracles were attributed to him.

“As his fame grew, a small group of disciples wanted to follow Hilarion. He began a series of journeys to find a place where he could live away from the world. He finally settled on Cyprus, where he died in 371 at about age 80.

“Hilarion is celebrated as the founder of monasticism in Palestine. Much of his fame flows from the biography of him written by Saint Jerome.” https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-hilarion/

Saints of the Day

Here are the saints for October 20, 2019.

The Saints are the holy bones of the Church and their lives the true Magisterium.

The Catholic Church has many saints and reading about their lives has been a spiritual journey Catholics have been on since the publication of the Golden Legend, http://sourcebooks.web.fordham.edu/basis/goldenlegend/

From Butler’s Calendar of the Saints (which follows the old dating) listing all of the saints of today. https://web.archive.org/web/20061023135300/http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/day1020.htm

Here is what the 1962 Roman Missal (old dating) says about St. John Cantius, Confessor, “The holy Priest, St. John Cantius, a native of Kenty (Poland), was a professor at the University of Cracow. Famous for his heroic charity and zeal, he died A. D. 1473.” (p. 1541). The Daily Missal and Liturgical Manual. (2004). To purchase this Missal for your library go to the publisher, Baronius Press: London: https://www.baroniuspress.com/book.php?wid=56&bid=4#tab=tab-1

From Butler’s Lives of the Saints, (old dating) by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. edition, [1894], ST. JOHN CANTIUS. “ST. JOHN was born at Kenty in Poland in 1403, and studied at Cracow with great ability, industry, and success, while his modesty and virtue drew all hearts to him. He was for a short time in charge of a parish; but he shrank from the burden of responsibility, and returned to his life of professor at Cracow. There for many years he lived a life of unobtrusive virtue, self-denial, and charity. His love for the Holy See led him often in pilgrimage to Rome, on foot and alone, and his devotion to the Passion drew him once to Jerusalem, where he hoped to win a martyr’s crown by preaching to the Turks. He died in 1473, at the age of seventy.” https://www.sacred-texts.com/chr/lots/lots326.htm

From Franciscan Media, (new dating) St. Paul of the Cross, (January 3, 1694 – October 18, 1775), “Born in northern Italy in 1694, Paul Daneo lived at a time when many regarded Jesus as a great moral teacher but no more. After a brief time as a soldier, he turned to solitary prayer, developing a devotion to Christ’s passion. Paul saw in the Lord’s passion a demonstration of God’s love for all people. In turn that devotion nurtured his compassion and supported a preaching ministry that touched the hearts of many listeners. He was known as one of the most popular preachers of his day, both for his words and for his generous acts of mercy.

“In 1720, Paul founded the Congregation of the Passion, whose members combined devotion to Christ’s passion with preaching to the poor, and rigorous penances. Known as the Passionists, they add a fourth vow to the traditional three of poverty, chastity, and obedience, to spread the memory of Christ’s passion among the faithful. Paul was elected superior general of the Congregation in 1747, spending the remainder of his life in Rome.

“Paul of the Cross died in 1775, and was canonized in 1867. Over 2,000 of his letters and several of his short writings have survived.” https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-paul-of-the-cross/

From Tradition in Action, (old dating) St. Artemius, “Artemius was a commander of the Imperial Army under Constantine. Julian the Apostate – Emperor from 361 to 363 – ordered him beheaded in 363.

“Julian the Apostate had raised up a huge persecution against the faithful Catholics. After torturing a great number of the faithful, he condemned the priests Eugene and Macarius. As they were being tortured, an official seated near the Emperor stood up and directed these words to him:

“Why do you so cruelly torture these holy men? Do not forget that you also are a man and that it was God who allowed you to be Emperor. Take care, for Satan, who asked permission to tempt Job, may have requested leave to use you against us in order to sow tare amid the wheat of Christ. But his scheme will be futile because he no longer has the power he had of old. Since Christ came and was raised on the Cross, Satan’s pride and power were defeated. Do not have illusions – O Emperor! – in following your love of Satan, do not persecute the Christians protected by God. The power of Christ is invincible.”

“Hearing these words, Julian became indignant and asked who was the insolent wretch who dared to pronounce such bold words. He was told that the man was Artemius of Alexandria, Governor of Egypt and Syria who had just arrived, bringing new troops for the war against Persia. The Emperor ordered him arrested. After St. Artemius endured many torments that aimed to make him apostatize, Julian gave the order for him to be beheaded.

“Before the execution, he asked for time to pray. He said:

“O Divine Jesus Christ, have pity on Thy Church. Thy altars will be desecrated, and the Blood of Thy alliance despised because of the blasphemies that Arius has vomited against Thee. He separated Thee, the only Son of God, and the Holy Spirit from the co-substantiality of the Father, proposing that the Father would be different from Thy nature – Thou who are the Author of all creation. He subjected Thee to time – Thou who existed before all centuries.”

“After saying these words he genuflected three times toward the East, and then again prayed aloud:

“God of God, King of Kings, Thou who are seated in Heaven at the right hand of the Father who generated Thou, Thou who are the crown of those who fight for the cause of piety, favorably hear this humble and unworthy servant and receive his soul in peace.”

“A voice replied from Heaven saying that his prayer had been heard, and that the Emperor would die in Persia, be succeeded by a Christian, and idolatry would be irremediably destroyed.

“After hearing these words, Artemius serenely laid down his head for the sword.” https://traditioninaction.org/SOD/j151sd_Artemius_10-20.html

Saints of the Day

Here are the saints for October 19, 2019, all wonderful; for they are the Church Triumphant.

What a blessing it is to read these stories each morning.

The Saints are the holy bones of the Church and their lives the true Magisterium.

The Catholic Church has many saints and reading about their lives has been a spiritual journey Catholics have been on since the publication of the Golden Legend, http://sourcebooks.web.fordham.edu/basis/goldenlegend/

From Butler’s Calendar of the Saints (which follows the old dating) listing all of the saints of today. https://web.archive.org/web/20061019144225/http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/day1019.htm

Here is what the 1962 Roman Missal (old dating) says about St. Peter of Alcantara, Confessor, “St. Peter, a Spaniard of noble birth, entered the Order of St. Francis at the age of 16. He re-established the primitive Franciscan rule, and gave St. Teresa powerful support in her work of reformation. He died A. D. 1562.” (p. 1540). The Daily Missal and Liturgical Manual. (2004). To purchase this Missal for your library go to the publisher, Baronius Press: London: https://www.baroniuspress.com/book.php?wid=56&bid=4#tab=tab-1

From Butler’s Lives of the Saints, (old dating) by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. edition, [1894], ST. PETER OF ALCANTARA. “PETER, while still a youth, left his home at Alcantara in Spain, and entered a convent of Discalced Franciscans. He rose quickly to high posts in the Order, but his thirst for penance was still unappeased, and in 1539, being then forty years old, he founded the first convent of the “Strict Observance.” The cells of the friars resembled graves rather than dwelling-places. That of St. Peter himself was four feet and a half in length, so that he could never lie down; he ate but once in three days; his sack-cloth habit and a cloak were his only garments, and he never covered his head or feet.

“In the bitter winter he would open the door and window of his cell that, by closing them again, he might experience some sensation of warmth. Amongst those whom he trained to perfection was St. Teresa. He read her soul, approved of her spirit of prayer, and strengthened her to carry out her reforms. St. Peter died, with great joy, kneeling in prayer, October 18, 1562, at the age of sixty-three.” https://www.sacred-texts.com/chr/lots/lots325.htm

From Franciscan Media, (new dating) St. Isaac Jogues, Jean de Brébeuf, and Companions, (d. 1642 – 1649), “Isaac Jogues and his companions were the first martyrs of the North American continent officially recognized by the Church. As a young Jesuit, Isaac Jogues, a man of learning and culture, taught literature in France. He gave up that career to work among the Huron Indians in the New World, and in 1636, he and his companions, under the leadership of Jean de Brébeuf, arrived in Quebec. The Hurons were constantly warred upon by the Iroquois, and in a few years Father Jogues was captured by the Iroquois and imprisoned for 13 months. His letters and journals tell how he and his companions were led from village to village, how they were beaten, tortured, and forced to watch as their Huron converts were mangled and killed.

“An unexpected chance for escape came to Isaac Jogues through the Dutch, and he returned to France, bearing the marks of his sufferings. Several fingers had been cut, chewed, or burnt off. Pope Urban VIII gave him permission to offer Mass with his mutilated hands: “It would be shameful that a martyr of Christ not be allowed to drink the Blood of Christ.”

“Welcomed home as a hero, Father Jogues might have sat back, thanked God for his safe return, and died peacefully in his homeland. But his zeal led him back once more to the fulfillment of his dreams. In a few months he sailed for his missions among the Hurons.

“In 1646, he and Jean de Lalande, who had offered his services to the missioners, set out for Iroquois country in the belief that a recently signed peace treaty would be observed. They were captured by a Mohawk war party, and on October 18, Father Jogues was tomahawked and beheaded. Jean de Lalande was killed the next day at Ossernenon, a village near Albany, New York.

“The first of the Jesuit missionaries to be martyred was René Goupil who with Lalande, had offered his services as an oblate. He was tortured along with Isaac Jogues in 1642, and was tomahawked for having made the sign of the cross on the brow of some children.

“Father Anthony Daniel, working among Hurons who were gradually becoming Christian, was killed by Iroquois on July 4, 1648. His body was thrown into his chapel, which was set on fire.

“Jean de Brébeuf was a French Jesuit who came to Canada at the age of 32 and labored there for 24 years. He went back to France when the English captured Quebec in 1629 and expelled the Jesuits, but returned to his missions four years later. Although medicine men blamed the Jesuits for a smallpox epidemic among the Hurons, Jean remained with them.

“He composed catechisms and a dictionary in Huron, and saw 7,000 converted before his death in 1649. Having been captured by the Iroquois at Sainte Marie, near Georgian Bay, Canada, Father Brébeuf died after four hours of extreme torture.

“Gabriel Lalemant had taken a fourth vow—to sacrifice his life for the Native Americans. He was horribly tortured to death along with Father Brébeuf.

“Father Charles Garnier was shot to death in 1649 as he baptized children and catechumens during an Iroquois attack.

“Father Noel Chabanel also was killed in 1649, before he could answer his recall to France. He had found it exceedingly hard to adapt to mission life. He could not learn the language, and the food and life of the Indians revolted him, plus he suffered spiritual dryness during his whole stay in Canada. Yet he made a vow to remain in his mission until death.

“These eight Jesuit martyrs of North America were canonized in 1930.” https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-isaac-jogues-jean-de-br-eacute-beuf-and-companions/

Saint of the Day

Here are the saints for October 18, 2019, (all about St. Luke today) all wonderful; for they are the Church Triumphant.

What a blessing it is to read these stories each morning.

The Saints are the holy bones of the Church and their lives the true Magisterium.

The Catholic Church has many saints and reading about their lives has been a spiritual journey Catholics have been on since the publication of the Golden Legend, http://sourcebooks.web.fordham.edu/basis/goldenlegend/

From Butler’s Calendar of the Saints (which follows the old dating) listing all of the saints of today. https://web.archive.org/web/20061015132255/http://www.catholic-forum.com/Saints/day1018.htm

Here is what the 1962 Roman Missal (old dating) says about St. Luke, Evangelist, “St. Luke was very probably born of pagan parents at Antioch. Converted, he became the missionary companion of St. Paul, who called him “the most dear physician” and “his fellow laborer”. After the death of his teacher, according to reliable authority, he preached the Gospel in Achaia, where he died at a ripe old age. He earned undying glory by his writing of the Third Gospel and the Acts of the Apostles.” (p. 1537). The Daily Missal and Liturgical Manual. (2004). To purchase this Missal for your library go to the publisher, Baronius Press: London: https://www.baroniuspress.com/book.php?wid=56&bid=4#tab=tab-1

From Butler’s Lives of the Saints, (old dating) by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. edition, [1894], ST. LUKE. “ST. LUKE, a physician at Antioch, and a painter, became a convert of St. Paul, and afterwards his fellow-laborer. He is best known to us as the historian of the New Testament. Though not an eye-witness of Our Lord’s life, the Evangelist diligently gathered information from the lips of the apostles, and wrote, as he tells us, all things in order. The acts of the Apostles were written by this Evangelist as a sequel to his Gospel, bringing the history .of the Church down to the first imprisonment of St. Paul at Rome.

“The humble historian never names himself, but by his occasional use of “we” for “they” we are able to detect his presence in the scenes which he describes. We thus find that he sailed with St. Paul and Silas from Troas to Macedonia; stayed behind apparently for seven years at Philippi, and, lastly, shared the shipwreck and perils of the memorable voyage to Rome. Here his own narrative ends, but from St. Paul’s Epistles we learn that St. Luke was his faithful companion to the end. He died a martyr’s death some time afterwards in Achaia.” https://www.sacred-texts.com/chr/lots/lots324.htm

From Franciscan Media, (new dating) St. Luke, (d. c. 84), Luke wrote one of the major portions of the New Testament, a two-volume work comprising the third Gospel and Acts of the Apostles. In the two books he shows the parallel between the life of Christ and that of the Church. He is the only Gentile Christian among the Gospel writers. Tradition holds him to be a native of Antioch, and Paul calls him “our beloved physician.” His Gospel was probably written between 70 and 85 A.D.

“Luke appears in Acts during Paul’s second journey, remains at Philippi for several years until Paul returns from his third journey, accompanies Paul to Jerusalem, and remains near him when he is imprisoned in Caesarea. During these two years, Luke had time to seek information and interview persons who had known Jesus. He accompanied Paul on the dangerous journey to Rome where he was a faithful companion.

“Luke’s unique character may best be seen by the emphases of his Gospel, which has been given a number of subtitles:

“ 1) The Gospel of Mercy

“2) The Gospel of Universal Salvation

“3) The Gospel of the Poor

“4) The Gospel of Absolute Renunciation

“5) The Gospel of Prayer and the Holy Spirit

“6) The Gospel of Joy” https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-luke/

From Tradition in Action, (old dating) St. Luke the Evangelist, “Luke was born in Antioch to pagan Greek parents. St. Paul met him at Troas and invited him to accompany him into Macedonia where they traveled first to Samothrace, Neapolis, and finally Philippi about the year 51. Later, he became the constant companion of St. Paul, following him everywhere. He alone remained with Paul when he was imprisoned in Rome about the year 61.

“After St. Paul’s death, St. Luke left Rome. There are conflicting reports about where he went. Some say he preached in Greece, others in Gaul. He wrote his Gospel with the aim of attracting the Gentiles to the goodness and mercy of the Lord. A little later he wrote the Acts of the Apostles.

“He died without shedding his blood, but the Church honored him with the title of martyr for the long sufferings and mortifications he endured for the cause of the Gospel.” https://traditioninaction.org/SOD/j150sd_Luke_10-18.html

Saint of the Day

Here are the saints for October 17, 2019, all wonderful; for they are the Church Triumphant.

What a blessing it is to read these stories each morning.

The Saints are the holy bones of the Church and their lives the true Magisterium.

The Catholic Church has many saints and reading about their lives has been a spiritual journey Catholics have been on since the publication of the Golden Legend, http://sourcebooks.web.fordham.edu/basis/goldenlegend/

From Butler’s Calendar of the Saints (which follows the old dating) listing all of the saints of today. https://web.archive.org/web/20061023134759/http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/day1017.htm

Here is what the 1962 Roman Missal (old dating) says about St. Margaret Mary Alacoque, Virgin, “St. Margaret Mary Alacoque was born at Verosvres (France) in 1647 and entered the Order of the Visitation at Paray-le-Monial in 1671. Jesus appeared to her in numerous visions , displaying to her His Sacred Heart, sometimes burning as a furnace, and sometimes torn and bleeding on account of the coldness and sins of men. In 1675 the great revelation was made to her that she, in union with Father de la Colombiere, SJ, was to be the chief instrument for instituting the Feast of the Sacred Heart and for spreading devotion to the Sacred Heart throughout the world. She died on October 17th A. D. 1690. (p. 1535.) The Daily Missal and Liturgical Manual. (2004). To purchase this Missal for your library go to the publisher, Baronius Press: London: https://www.baroniuspress.com/book.php?wid=56&bid=4#tab=tab-1

From Franciscan Media, (new dating) St. Ignatius of Antioch, (d. c. 107), “Born in Syria, Ignatius converted to Christianity and eventually became bishop of Antioch. In the year 107, Emperor Trajan visited Antioch and forced the Christians there to choose between death and apostasy. Ignatius would not deny Christ and thus was condemned to be put to death in Rome.

“Ignatius is well known for the seven letters he wrote on the long journey from Antioch to Rome. Five of these letters are to churches in Asia Minor; they urge the Christians there to remain faithful to God and to obey their superiors. He warns them against heretical doctrines, providing them with the solid truths of the Christian faith.

“The sixth letter was to Polycarp, bishop of Smyrna, who was later martyred for the faith. The final letter begs the Christians in Rome not to try to stop his martyrdom. “The only thing I ask of you is to allow me to offer the libation of my blood to God. I am the wheat of the Lord; may I be ground by the teeth of the beasts to become the immaculate bread of Christ.”

“Ignatius bravely met the lions in the Circus Maximus.” https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-ignatius-of-antioch/

Saints of the Day

Here are the saints for October 16, 2019, all wonderful; for they are the Church Triumphant.

What a blessing it is to read these stories each morning.

The Saints are the holy bones of the Church and their lives the true Magisterium.

The Catholic Church has many saints and reading about their lives has been a spiritual journey Catholics have been on since the publication of the Golden Legend, http://sourcebooks.web.fordham.edu/basis/goldenlegend/

From Butler’s Calendar of the Saints (which follows the old dating) listing all of the saints of today. https://web.archive.org/web/20061014211148/http://www.catholic-forum.com/Saints/day1016.htm

Here is what the 1962 Roman Missal (old dating) says about St. Hedwig, Widow, “St. Hedwig, duchess of Poland, of royal stock and the maternal aunt of St. Elizabeth of Hungary, retired into a Cistercian convent after the death of her husband. She died A. D. 1243.” (p. 1534). The Daily Missal and Liturgical Manual. (2004). To purchase this Missal for your library go to the publisher, Baronius Press: London: https://www.baroniuspress.com/book.php?wid=56&bid=4#tab=tab-1

From Butler’s Lives of the Saints, (old dating) by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. edition, [1894], ST. GALL, Abbot. “ST. GALL was born in Ireland soon after the middle of the sixth century, of pious, noble, and rich parents. When St. Columban left Ireland, St. Gall accompanied him into England, and afterward into France, where they arrived in 585. St. Columban founded the monastery of Anegray, in a wild forest in the diocese of Besançon, and two years afterward another in Luxeuil. Being driven thence by King Theodoric, the Saints both withdrew into the territories of Theodebert. St. Columban, however, retired into Italy, but St. Gall was prevented from bearing him company by a grievous fit of illness.

“St. Gall was a priest before he left Ireland, and having learned the language of the country where he settled, near the Lake of Constance, he converted to the faith a great number of idolaters. The cells which this Saint built there for those who desired to serve God with him, he gave to the monastery which bears his name. A synod of bishops, with the clergy and people, earnestly desired to place the Saint in the episcopal see of Constance; but his modesty refused the dignity. He died in the year 646.” https://www.sacred-texts.com/chr/lots/lots322.htm

From Franciscan Media, (new dating) St. Margaret Mary Alacoque, (July 22, 1647 – October 17, 1690), “Margaret Mary was chosen by Christ to arouse the Church to a realization of the love of God symbolized by the heart of Jesus.

“Her early years were marked by sickness and a painful home situation. “The heaviest of my crosses was that I could do nothing to lighten the cross my mother was suffering.” After considering marriage for some time, Margaret Mary entered the Order of the Visitation nuns at the age of 24.

“A Visitation nun was “not to be extraordinary except by being ordinary,” but the young nun was not to enjoy this anonymity. A fellow novice termed Margaret Mary humble, simple, and frank, but above all, kind and patient under sharp criticism and correction. She could not meditate in the formal way expected, though she tried her best to give up her “prayer of simplicity.” Slow, quiet, and clumsy, she was assigned to help an infirmarian who was a bundle of energy.

“On December 21, 1674, three years a nun, she received the first of her revelations. She felt “invested” with the presence of God, though always afraid of deceiving herself in such matters. The request of Christ was that his love for humankind be made evident through her.

“During the next 13 months, Christ appeared to her at intervals. His human heart was to be the symbol of his divine-human love. By her own love Margaret Mary was to make up for the coldness and ingratitude of the world—by frequent and loving Holy Communion, especially on the first Friday of each month, and by an hour’s vigil of prayer every Thursday night in memory of his agony and isolation in Gethsemane. He also asked that a feast of reparation be instituted.

“Like all saints, Margaret Mary had to pay for her gift of holiness. Some of her own sisters were hostile. Theologians who were called in declared her visions delusions and suggested that she eat more heartily. Later, parents of children she taught called her an impostor, an unorthodox innovator. A new confessor, the Jesuit Claude de la Colombière, recognized her genuineness and supported her. Against her great resistance, Christ called her to be a sacrificial victim for the shortcomings of her own sisters, and to make this known.

“After serving as novice mistress and assistant superior, Margaret Mary died at the age of 43, while being anointed. She said: “I need nothing but God, and to lose myself in the heart of Jesus.” https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-margaret-mary-alacoque/

Essay about St. Teresa

This essay about her from Catholic World Report is wonderful.

An excerpt.

Editor’s note: The following essay was originally given in slightly different form as an address on November 23, 2015, at the presentation of Fr. Uwe Michael Lang’s book Signs of the Holy One: Liturgy, Ritual, and Expression of the Sacred.

“Among the signal events to mark the Church’s life in 2015 was the 500th birthday of St Teresa of Jesus. The year’s peak event, her feast on 15 October, was overshadowed by headlines from the Synod; yet this year has been nonetheless a Teresian year, calling to mind the Castilian Doctor’s formidable legacy. I found myself gently haunted by Teresa while reading Fr Uwe Michael Lang’s Signs of The Holy One [Ignatius Press, 2015].

“I should like, with her help, to reflect on questions raised by the book. For this is a volume that interrogates. It formulates problems not susceptible of easy resolution. There is material here for an examen of consciousness. I invoke the term ‘consciousness’ advisedly. Although Fr Lang mainly addresses issues of liturgical praxis, he knows better than just to bemoan the transgression of rubrics. He points towards a breakdown of sense in liturgy. He shows how this breakdown ominously points to senselessness likewise in life and belief. It is tempting to imagine his subtitle ending with a question mark: ‘Liturgy, Ritual, and Expression of the Sacred?’ Does the Church’s liturgy enable, now, the expression and communication of sacred realities? Is the ‘sacred’ still a meaningful category?

“The book’s first part expounds the sense-content of ‘sacredness’ as defined by modern anthropology and theology. The sheer variety of approaches bewilders. This is brought out in the second part, which indicates wrong turns taken in sacred architecture, music, and art over the past half-century. They happened because the signifier ‘sacred’ was often put, as it were, on its head. Hijacked by human criteria, it could no longer effectively point upward and out to the transcendent. The crisis of sacred liturgy and art is thus a crisis of purpose, of finality. By way of illustration, Fr Lang cites examples apt to make the reader smile. Really, though, there is cause for sadness. When the proclamatory impact of Christian devotion is compromised; when the aesthetic response to faith becomes purely subjective, cut off from a sharable paradigm; when ritual seems little more than fortuitously repeated action: then woe is us, for the Gospel is not preached with the force it requires and deserves. What can we do? How can we respond? We might turn for counsel to the half-millenarian, plain-speaking Doctor of Ávila.

“Teresa’s Autobiography, completed in her fiftieth year, chronicles the irruption of the divine into an ordinary life. Seeing Teresa at a distance, we may object to the adjective ‘ordinary’. She seems anything but! Teresa, however, argued this point with passion. She was conscious of singular favour shown her; but she insisted that nothing in her nature marked her out from the common run of men and women. She presents her life in its extraordinariness as a typical life, an exemplar each of us might emulate, had we but faith and courage to surrender to God’s work in us. The trajectory she traces reaches from the outset right to the loftiest end of spiritual life. She counsels souls who wobble ‘like hens, with feet tied together’ but also those who soar like eagles (xxxix.12).1 Nor does she forget the perplexing darkness of the long intermediate stage when the soul, like a timid dove, is dazzled by rare glimpses of God’s Sun while, ‘when looking at itself, its eyes are blinded by clay. The little dove is blind’ (xx.29). Everything she writes, she tells us, is born of experience. For long years she herself ‘had neither any joy in God nor pleasure in the world’ (viii.2). She lived in an in-between state, a no-woman’s land. What changed it? No summary can do justice to her subtle account of the transformative miracle wrought in her by God.

“We can, though, get some sense of its impact. Teresa testifies how, at a decisive juncture, ‘todos los que me conocían veían claro estar otra mi alma’: her soul had become other; it was no longer what it used to be (xxviii.13). She had seen something that changed her way of seeing. It caused others to see her differently. It was not, she says, a matter of ‘a radiance that dazzles’, rather of ‘a soft whiteness’, ‘an infused radiance’ that, for being gentle, was so unlike any earthly light that in comparison with it ‘the brightness of our sun seems dim’. Measured against Uncreated Light all light of this world seems ‘artificial’. Had we a choice, she assures us, we should never again ‘want to open our eyes for the purpose of seeing it’ (xxviii.5). To entertain such grace is not just sweetness and joy. It brings on a new kind of homelessness, a numbing sense of being out of place, and that for good. At the end of her book Teresa remarks that life in this world seems to her now ‘a kind of sleep’ (xl.22). She yearns to awaken to eternity. She is weary of being torn apart by existential – or better, essential – tension, for ‘natural weakness’ cannot sustain such spiritual vehemence (xl.7). Anyone who makes even moderate progress in prayer is reminded, like her, of how little Spirit our natural human frame can bear. ‘¡Válgame Dios!’, he or she might exclaim with Teresa: ‘God help me!’

“Teresa is a witness to the beautiful dimension of faith. When she speaks of it, she is categorical: ‘The fact of seeing Christ left an impression of his exceeding beauty etched on my soul to this day: once was enough’ (xxxvii.4). This beauty is disturbing, even dangerous. To behold it is to be struck down. It is to walk thenceforth, like Jacob out of Jabbok, with a limp. Teresa illustrates what this means when she speaks of her transverberation, when her heart was pierced by an angel with a fiery lance. The moment has acquired emblematic force in the mystical and aesthetic canons of the West. Bernini’s marble account of it still both enchants and shocks, yet is, for all its formal perfection, but an outsider’s limited view. Teresa stresses the exquisite beauty of the angel, an emissary sent from before the burning holiness of God. The impact on her of this beautiful encounter is complex. So physical was the transfixing that her innards seemed to be drawn out when the lance retreated. So spiritual was it that it left her ‘completely afire with a great love of God’. She makes no apology for not defining the ratio of embodied and transcendent experience. Paradox alone can convey what she went through, as she sums up: ‘It is not bodily pain, but spiritual, though the body has a share in it – indeed, a great share.’ Small wonder that for days she was left as in a stupor (xxix.13f.).”

Retrieved October 15, 2019 from https://www.catholicworldreport.com/2019/10/15/saint-teresa-of-jesus-and-the-search-for-the-sacred/

 

Saint of the Day

Here are the saints for October 15, 2019, (all about St. Teresa today) all wonderful; for they are the Church Triumphant.

What a blessing it is to read these stories each morning.

The Saints are the holy bones of the Church and their lives the true Magisterium.

The Catholic Church has many saints and reading about their lives has been a spiritual journey Catholics have been on since the publication of the Golden Legend, http://sourcebooks.web.fordham.edu/basis/goldenlegend/

From Butler’s Calendar of the Saints (which follows the old dating) listing all of the saints of today. https://web.archive.org/web/20061023135011/http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/day1015.htm

Here is what the 1962 Roman Missal (old dating) says about St. Teresa, Virgin, Doctor, “The seraphic St. Teresa, born at Avila (Spain), at the age of 18 entered the convent of St. Mary of Mount Carmel. As the Reformer of the Carmelites, she reestablished the primitive observance of their ancient Rule. On account of her invaluable works on mystical Theology, she may be considered one of the greatest Doctors of the Church. She died A. D. 1582.” (p. 1534). The Daily Missal and Liturgical Manual. (2004). To purchase this Missal for your library go to the publisher, Baronius Press: London: https://www.baroniuspress.com/book.php?wid=56&bid=4#tab=tab-1

From Butler’s Lives of the Saints, (old dating) by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. edition, [1894], ST. TERESA. “WHEN a child of seven years, Teresa ran away from her home at Avila in Spain, in the hope of being martyred by the Moors. Being brought back and asked the reason of her flight, she replied, “I want to see God, and I must die before I can see Him.” She then began with her brother to build a hermitage in the garden, and was often heard repeating “Forever, forever” Some years later she became a Carmelite nun.

“Frivolous conversations checked her progress towards perfection, but at last, in her thirty-first year, she gave herself wholly to God. A vision showed her the very place in hell to which her own light faults would have led her, and she lived ever after in the deepest distrust of self. She was called to reform her Order, favored with distinct commands from Our Lord, and her heart was pierced with divine love; but she dreaded nothing so much as delusion, and to the last acted only under obedience to her confessors, which both made her strong and kept her safe. She died on October 4, 1582.” https://www.sacred-texts.com/chr/lots/lots321.htm

From Franciscan Media, (new dating) St. Teresa of Avila, (March 28, 1515 – October 4, 1582), “Teresa lived in an age of exploration as well as political, social, and religious upheaval. It was the 16th century, a time of turmoil and reform. She was born before the Protestant Reformation and died almost 20 years after the closing of the Council of Trent.

“The gift of God to Teresa in and through which she became holy and left her mark on the Church and the world is threefold: She was a woman; she was a contemplative; she was an active reformer.

“As a woman, Teresa stood on her own two feet, even in the man’s world of her time. She was “her own woman,” entering the Carmelites despite strong opposition from her father. She is a person wrapped not so much in silence as in mystery. Beautiful, talented, outgoing, adaptable, affectionate, courageous, enthusiastic, she was totally human. Like Jesus, she was a mystery of paradoxes: wise, yet practical; intelligent, yet much in tune with her experience; a mystic, yet an energetic reformer; a holy woman, a womanly woman.

“Teresa was a woman “for God,” a woman of prayer, discipline, and compassion. Her heart belonged to God. Her ongoing conversion was an arduous lifelong struggle, involving ongoing purification and suffering. She was misunderstood, misjudged, and opposed in her efforts at reform. Yet she struggled on, courageous and faithful; she struggled with her own mediocrity, her illness, her opposition. And in the midst of all this she clung to God in life and in prayer. Her writings on prayer and contemplation are drawn from her experience: powerful, practical, and graceful. She was a woman of prayer; a woman for God.

“Teresa was a woman “for others.” Though a contemplative, she spent much of her time and energy seeking to reform herself and the Carmelites, to lead them back to the full observance of the primitive Rule. She founded over a half-dozen new monasteries. She traveled, wrote, fought—always to renew, to reform. In her self, in her prayer, in her life, in her efforts to reform, in all the people she touched, she was a woman for others, a woman who inspired and gave life.

“Her writings, especially the Way of Perfection and The Interior Castle, have helped generations of believers.

“In 1970, the Church gave her the title she had long held in the popular mind: Doctor of the Church. She and St. Catherine of Siena were the first women so honored.” https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-teresa-of-avila/

From Tradition in Action, (old dating) St. Teresa of Avila, “Teresa was at the Carmel of Toledo when the King of Portugal, Dom Sebastian, was killed and his army defeated at the great battle against the Moors at Alcacer-Quibir in Morocco in 1578. The saint had a revelation regarding the defeat. She was deeply saddened and wept, since she greatly desired Christendom’s advance and its enemies conquered.

“She complained to Our Lord: “My God, why did Thou permit the defeat of Thy people and the victory of Thy enemies?” Our Lord answered her: “If I found them prepared to be brought into My presence, why are you afflicted?”

“Her feeling of sorrow dissipated as she considered the glory the soldiers killed in battle were already enjoying. She admired those warriors whom God had found prepared for eternal happiness, especially considering the normally lax habits of soldiers. Immediately she desired to extend her Carmelite reform to Portugal.

“She ardently prayed to know the divine will, and on the Feast of the Assumption, an answer came. Our Lord told her:

“My daughter, you will not go to Portugal to found the houses of your reform. Your daughters and sons will do this in the future when I will end the chastisement inflicted on Portugal, and employ My mercy with this country. The increase in numbers of good religious will give me cause to raise Portugal from the misery into which it will have fallen, restore to it the happiness it enjoyed of old, and be the promise of future glories.” https://traditioninaction.org/SOD/j042sdTeresaAvila10-16.htm